Laboratório Nacional
de Luz Síncrotron

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History of the Sirius Project

BACK

The new Synchrotron Light Source Sirius is the result of a process of expansion of scientific and technological activities in Brazil, for which there is the undeniable contribution of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). The current definition of the Sirius project is the result of a continuous process of transformation and improvement, along which there were several important milestones.

 

TIMELINE

2003 

The need to initiate studies on a new synchrotron light source is presented for the first time during the 13th Annual Users Meeting.

2006 

Recommendation, in the 2006-2009 Directive Plan of the ABTLuS (former name of the CNPEM), of the creation of a task force to initiate studies of a new low-emittance storage ring for the LNLS.

2008 

First conceptual pre-proposal for a new synchrotron is delivered to the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MCTI). The Government approves the continuation of these studies and directs R$ 2 million in funding for the project, with the amount released in 2009.

2009 

Two workshops are held to discuss with users the features of the new Synchrotron Light Source. Electron energy is defined (3 GeV) as well as some essential parameters for the development of the basics of the project of the new source.

2010 

The initial design is shown in IPAC10 (International Particle Accelerator Conference), Kyoto, Japan, with the name Sirius. In the same year, the search for a suitable area for installation of the new source is started.

2011 

LNLS’ International Scientific Committee records the need to build a new synchrotron and recommends the creation of an international Machine Advisory Committee (MAC) for evaluation and monitoring of the Sirius project. In the same year, the initiative “Construction of a 3rd generation Synchrotron Light Source” is incorporated into the 2012-2015 Multi-Year Plan of the Federal Government, and in 2012, is included in the 2012-2015 National Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation and the Annual Budget Law (LOA).

2012 

First full review of the Sirius project is made by the MAC. Sirius was at the time ranked as a 3rd generation synchrotron and its magnetic lattice is very well evaluated. However, the committee recommends reducing its emittance (1.7 to less than 1 nm.rad). Promptly, LNLS redraws the machine and proposes an emittance of only 0.28 nm.rad, the lowest ever planned for a synchrotron with energy of 3 GeV. Therefore, Sirius is now considered a pioneer of the 4th generation of synchrotrons, next to the Swedish source MAX-IV. The improvement in the Magnetic Lattice demanded also revisions to the design of the source components, the building and its experimental stations.

2013 

Acquisition of 150,000 m² terrain adjacent to the CNPEM campus for installation of Sirius, expropriated by the Government of São Paulo State, and start of the earthworks.

2014 

End of the earthwork of the terrain, signing of the contract with the construction company and laying of the cornerstone of the civil works.

2015 

Effective start of the civil works of the building for the new light source. At the end of the year, almost 20 percent of the civil works were complete.


HISTORY

2003

The need to initiate studies on a new synchrotron light source is presented for the first time during the 13th Annual Users Meeting.

2006

Recommendation, in the 2006-2009 Directive Plan of the ABTLuS (former name of the CNPEM), of the creation of a task force to initiate studies of a new low-emittance storage ring for the LNLS.

2008

First conceptual pre-proposal for a new synchrotron is delivered to the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation (MCTI). The Government approves the continuation of these studies and directs R$ 2 million in funding for the project, with the amount released in 2009.

2009

Two workshops are held to discuss with users the features of the new Synchrotron Light Source. Electron energy is defined (3 GeV) as well as some essential parameters for the development of the basics of the project of the new source.

2010

The initial design is shown in IPAC10 (International Particle Accelerator Conference), Kyoto, Japan, with the name Sirius. In the same year, the search for a suitable area for installation of the new source is started.

2011

LNLS’ International Scientific Committee records the need to build a new synchrotron and recommends the creation of an international Machine Advisory Committee (MAC) for evaluation and monitoring of the Sirius project. In the same year, the initiative “Construction of a 3rd generation Synchrotron Light Source” is incorporated into the 2012-2015 Multi-Year Plan of the Federal Government, and in 2012, is included in the 2012-2015 National Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation and the Annual Budget Law (LOA).

2012

First full review of the Sirius project is made by the MAC. Sirius was at the time ranked as a 3rd generation synchrotron and its magnetic lattice is very well evaluated. However, the committee recommends reducing its emittance (1.7 to less than 1 nm.rad). Promptly, LNLS redraws the machine and proposes an emittance of only 0.28 nm.rad, the lowest ever planned for a synchrotron with energy of 3 GeV. Therefore, Sirius is now considered a pioneer of the 4th generation of synchrotrons, next to the Swedish source MAX-IV. The improvement in the Magnetic Lattice demanded also revisions to the design of the source components, the building and its experimental stations.

2013

Acquisition of 150,000 m² terrain adjacent to the CNPEM campus for installation of Sirius, expropriated by the Government of São Paulo State, and start of the earthworks.

2014

End of the earthwork of the terrain, signing of the contract with the construction company and laying of the cornerstone of the civil works.

2015

Effective start of the civil works of the building for the new light source. At the end of the year, almost 20 percent of the civil works were complete.