Laboratório Nacional
de Luz Síncrotron

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Conception

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The first Synchrotron Light Source from Brazil and from the Southern Hemisphere begins to be designed in 1987 and is inaugurated 10 years later, in 1997. Learn more about the history of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory from 1980 to 1984.

 

The history of the construction of a big machine for large-scale science in Brazil begins in 1950, with a failed attempt of the then newly created National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq) for the operation of a Synchrocyclotron in the Brazilian Center for Physics Research (CBPF), in Rio de Janeiro.

 

Also in the 1950s, the University of São Paulo (USP) starts the installation of a Van der Graaf electrostatic accelerator led by Professor Oscar Sala for research in Experimental Nuclear Physics. An initiative of the newly created Funding Authority for Studies and Projects (Finep), in the 60s, for importing an accelerator was not successful. Later, in 1972, the USP acquires a Pelletronelectrostatic accelerator for more advanced studies in Experimental Nuclear Physics.

 

In 1979, during the meeting of the Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science (SBPC), in Fortaleza, the construction of a linear proton accelerator for the investigation of pions and other elementary particles was raised by José Leite Lopes and discussed, but never accomplished.

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION: FROM 1985 TO 1996 >

TIMELINE

1980 

The president of the CNPq, Lynaldo Albuquerque, requested to the Director of the CBPF, Roberto Lobo, proposals to build a laboratory with a big machine for research that would provide infrastructure for researchers from around the Country.

1982 

Among the ideas considered by Lobo, an electron accelerator for the study of synchrotron radiation is proposed.

1983 

An executive committee is appointed for the project, coordinated by Aldo Craievich, a CBPF researcher, and external members linked to the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, State University of Campinas and USP.

1984 

On December 5th, 1984, the Brazilian Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (LNRS) is formally established with temporary direction of Roberto Lobo.


HISTORY

1980

The president of the CNPq, Lynaldo Albuquerque, requested to the Director of the CBPF, Roberto Lobo, proposals to build a laboratory with a big machine for research that would provide infrastructure for researchers from around the Country.

The beginning of the decade saw the emergence of the first synchrotron light sources of the so-called second generation: circular electron accelerators optimized to produce synchrotron radiation specifically for the study of materials.

1982

Among the ideas considered by Lobo, there was the proposal of an electron accelerator for the study of synchrotron radiation. The proposal was formally presented to the scientific community at a meeting sponsored by CNPq with the leading scientific societies in the Country, in August 1982.
 
In September, Roberto Lobo renounces to the direction of the CBPF and is appointed coordinator of the Synchrotron Radiation Project and becomes responsible for feasibility studies suggested at the meeting.

1983

An executive committee is appointed for the project, coordinated by Aldo Craievich, a CBPF researcher, and external members linked to the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, State University of Campinas and USP.

1984

The Technical and Scientific Board is appointed, with the participation of scientists from several institutions.
 
On December 5th, 1984, the Brazilian Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (LNRS) is formally established with temporary direction of Roberto Lobo.