Laboratório Nacional
de Luz Síncrotron

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Expansion

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The first Synchrotron Light Source from Brazil and from the Southern Hemisphere begins to be designed in 1987 and is inaugurated 10 years later, in 1997. Learn more about the history of the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory from 2009 to Today.

 

 

< INAUGURATION AND CONSOLIDATION: FROM 1997 TO 2008

TIMELINE

2009 

The LNLS and research centers linked to it are restructured. The campus is renamed as Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM) under the management of ABTLuS.

 

Along with investments in the modernization of the beamlines, the construction of a new administrative building for the LNLS is started on the CNPEM campus, adjacent to the building of the synchrotron light source, which improved the access of employees and users to facilities.

2012 

Also in 2012, the first Sirius project is presented to the international committee of specialists, which recommended a more daring design. Sirius is redesigned and the project indicates the possibility of reaching the lowest emittance of the world in its energy class.

2013 

An extension of the land adjacent to the CNPEM is expropriated by the State Government of São Paulo for the construction of Sirius.

2014 

In addition, the earthworks and the executive design of the Sirius buildings are concluded. On December 19th, the cornerstone is laid, with civil works expected to last 40 months.

2015 

At the end of the year, nearly 20% of the civil works of Sirius are completed.


HISTORY

2009

The LNLS and research centers linked to it are restructured. The campus is renamed as Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM) under the management of ABTLuS. The Center is then composed of three national laboratories: the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS), the Brazilian Bioethanol Science and Technology National Laboratory (keeping the acronym CTBE) and the Brazilian Biosciences National Laboratory (LNBio), the new name of CeBiME. The C2Nano, in turn, continues as a center linked to the LNLS.
 
With this change, the CNPEM gets a new Director-General, and each of the National Laboratories gets their own Director. In the LNLS, Antonio Jose Roque takes over as Director.

In February and August, two workshops were held with users to discuss features of the new Synchrotron Light Source. The energy of electrons is set to 3 GeV, and some of the essential parameters for the development of the first basic design of the new Source.

2010

In 2010, after an internal competition, the LNLS-2 project is renamed Sirius, the brightest star in the night sky. There are advances in the definitions of the project and the search for a suitable area for the civil works required to install the new light source is started.

2011

Along with investments in the modernization of the beamlines, the construction of a new administrative building for the LNLS is started on the CNPEM campus, adjacent to the building of the synchrotron light source, which improved the access of employees and users to facilities.

Also in 2011, the Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano) is created from three experimental units previously linked to the LNLS through the C2Nano – the Electron Microscopy Laboratory (LME), the Scanning Tunneling and Atomic ForceMicroscopy Laboratory (MTA) and the Microfabrication Laboratory (LMF) – and becomes part of the CNPEM. The following year, the Social Organization ABTLuS changes name to CNPEM, reflecting the restructuring of the center started years before.

There is also the commissioning of the PGM beamline.

2012

Also in 2012, the first Sirius project is presented to the international committee of specialists, which recommended a more daring design. Sirius is redesigned and the project indicates the possibility of reaching the lowest emittance of the world in its energy class.

The commissioning of the IMX beamline is completed. The beamline is dedicated to X-ray Tomography with millimetric resolution, and in the following year the beamline is open to users.

2013

An extension of the land adjacent to the CNPEM is expropriated by the State Government of São Paulo for the construction of Sirius.

The commissioning of the XDS beamline is concluded, based on the third Insertion Device of the UVX Synchrotron Light Source, a Superconductor Wiggler. The beamline is open to users in the second semester.

2014

In addition, the earthworks and the executive design of the Sirius buildings are concluded. On December 19th, the cornerstone is laid, with civil works expected to last 40 months.

A new beamline is commissioned in UVX, the IR beamline dedicated to infrared nanospectroscopy.

2015

At the end of the year, nearly 20% of the civil works of Sirius are completed.